Writings about

the many life lessons

unearthed when we dig

in the dirt . . . and pursue

a range of other interests

in the constantly evolving

garden of life.


Saturday, May 10, 2014

A rose thrives, despite my efforts

Some plants just won't die. The Rose, which I wrote about here,
is one of those. It performed so elegantly last year, I wanted to put it in spot better than next to the mailbox.

It's back and bigger than ever.

So, late last winter I pruned its canes, then in early spring I set out to relocate it, going at with a shovel and a pick. But it held on, making it clear that the only way to move it was to cut away most of its roots. Not wanting to do that, I simply ignored the plant. As I had done last year.

As it did last year, the rose survived, and bloomed, as these images show. In fact, this year it produced more buds than last year, when it got whacked accidentally by my string cutter; it is like many of us, made stronger in the broken places – often with no help from anyone.





I plead guilty to doing nothing for this determined survivor (pest-ridden leaves verify that), and I admit to enjoying it. Call it the rose that thrives amid my ambivalence.

When I cut the last bud and gave it to Lyn, she said, "We love that rose, and I'm glad you didn't dig it up."



Not because I didn't try. If I had succeeded in digging it up, the stress might have killed it – along with our pleasure. Sometimes a failure beats a try.








12 comments:

  1. Love it!! Great story. Kurt

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks much, Kurt. You and Carol would love this rose.

      Delete
  2. Lee, I actually love roses planted behind a mail box. Don't move it. I had them planted there in my first Sandy Springs Garden and in my Brookhaven Garden.
    When a rose finds it's home , Let it be. It is happy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anna, that's persuasive advice, considering your vast knowledge about roses – and your prize-winning collection. The Rose is happy, it's being, and I'm letting it alone.

      Delete
  3. Glad to see it still thriving. Your post has encouraged to keep my single rose bush planted 20 years ago unwisely in the shade. In sun I'm sure it would be huge by now. It's roots also refusing to be dug up thus far, but you gave me an idea. Just cut off some of the roots. It actually may still survive. The rose wants you to love it. If given a chance it will try to show off. How is the crepe myrtle that you pruned last year? I think they should be in bloom now in your region.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, pruning the roots, wrapping them in wet sphagnum and replanting should help your rose thrive in the sun. If my rose keeps surviving and thriving and blooming, I might just move it when I dig up the area to plant a new mailbox.

      That myrtle is looking good, leafing out but probably won't be blooming before June. Stay tuned. I have high hopes for a good pollarding.

      Delete
  4. With apologies to the Coen Brothers, it's clear The Rose Abides.

    (Reference: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYsw0KVRjCM)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love The Dude in "The Big Lebowski" and like the character in that fine movie, (you watching the Coen Brothers' "Fargo" on FX TV?) The Rose does indeed abide – despite my worst efforts.

      Delete
  5. Gotta respect that rose. A survivor worth applauding.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The only problem with that rose is that it wasn't a problem at all and didn't need to be fixed. It is fine and happy just where it is. :o) I'm glad you left it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! How many times have I fixed what wasn't broke. The rose's roots saved me from myself and the loss of rose beauty. Even today, it's still in bloom.

      Delete

To submit a comment, simply comment as: "name/URL" and fill in your name.
A URL is not required.