Writings about

the many life lessons

unearthed when we dig

in the dirt . . . and pursue

a wide range of other interests

in the constantly changing

garden of life.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Begonia Born to Be Art

The hardy begonia, which I recently wrote about here, is the plant that just keeps on giving.

Carol Pruitt, one of several friends to whom I passed along this popular plant, makes art – in photography and flower arranging. (That term is too restrictive, as she uses more of nature than just flowers in her arrangements.) A while back I featured some of her creations in this post.

Now, she is using the hardy begonia’s blooms and leaves to create art that is not only exquisite, but also evocative of autumn’s bountiful harvest. Take a look:

All photographs by Carol Pruitt



  

Recently, Carol bought a new container, using it for the arrangements below. The container "inspired me," she says, because "it allows for a larger, bold statement." That statement includes dahlia blooms, whose strong colors contrast nicely with the begonia's delicate ones.




Begonia grandis, in pink and white, has one of the longest shows in the garden, even though it dies all the way back in winter, and its leaves peek from the ground later than many perennials.

Once it gets going, it sure makes up for lost time. Impressive blooms, colorful, heavily veined leaves light up many a garden.

With autumn aflame and winter clearing its throat, soon the seed pods will dry and rattle when brushed. Then, the elegant images of Carol's arrangements will be all that is left of this grand begonia.

What a way to go.  




26 comments:

  1. Hey Lee,

    Thanks to Carol for sending pictures of her beautiful arrangements featuring begonia grandis. I do love especially the ones with dahlias and begonias. It is such a surprise the leaves and flowers hold up so well.

    Always I've admired the work of those so talented with arrangements, including my sister.

    I can grow, but can arrange nothing! I can appreciate and enjoy!

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    1. Hey, Barbara. Indeed, that Carol has a gift that is not given to all. Fine gardeners cannot necessarily create fine arrangements; Carol does both. We're talking about her as if she isn't here. I hope she's reading your appreciation.

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  2. This is a beautiful way to contrast and capture the different shapes, textures and colours. I love the first two photos, they remind me of a horn of plenty, perfect for Thanksgiving! There's a touch of poetry in your last paragraph, Lee, beautiful imagery :)

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    1. Ahhh, Rosemary, thank you; I'm glad you enjoyed the images and the imagery. Beautiful art does inspire. I know I'm telling you, a fine artist yourself, what you already know.

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  3. Beautiful compositions. Those big, gorgeous begonia leaves are an effective foil to the fat vegetables and ferny leaves. Nice photo vignettes!

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    1. Hey, Laurrie, I'm glad they resonate with you. They really are delicious.

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  4. wow. carol is a friend and fellow garden club member, and quite obviously, a very talented artist. beautiful work!

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    1. You both have talented friends. And your friend Carol indeed makes beautiful work with nature's bounty. All best to you.

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  5. Carol certainly is an inspiration with these creations. I can't wait until my begonias are large enough to rob them of leaves to decorate with. Those seed pods sound intrigueing too.

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    1. No worries, Lisa, as fast as this begonia grows, you'll have leaves aplenty before you know it. Happy decorating!

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  6. Lee,,,, I have done a lot of flower arranging with plants from my garden__ but never thought of using these begonia leaves. I have used the blooms as a filler but never the leaves.

    Thanks to you and Carol for this idea. Never too old to learn, I guess.

    Weather in Atlanta has been glorious. Can't stay inside.

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    1. I'm glad you have the idea, Anna, and I know you'll use it to make some beautiful art. Enjoy that weather while ye may.

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  7. WOW!!...the first one would make a great painting

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    1. Sharon, I second that emotion. Cheers.

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  8. What beautiful arrangements! Thanks for sharing these with us, Lee. :-)

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    1. My pleasure, Beth. 'Preciate your stopping by. Cheers.

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  9. The first two images make me think of old master's paintings. I like the way Carol has made use of fruit, vegetables and a variety of foliage. Nicely done!

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    1. Jennifer, I'm with you; I thought the same when I first saw them. Still life art, they are. All best to you.

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  10. Carol has a great eye for design - thanks for sharing these with us.
    Stella

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    1. Glad to do it, Stella. Sharing such inspiring art is one of the ways we celebrate our common connections.

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  11. Wow! Thanks, Lee for showcasing my art with your fine words. How lovely to receive so many compliments from your readers. You all inspire me.

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    1. Carol, that makes it mutual inspiration; your art certainly strikes a chord, and I'm happy I was able to share it.

      Here's hoping the Muse will continue to visit you often.

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  12. Her arrangements are beautiful! I really like how she uses the vegetables along with flowers.

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    1. Carol's talent's quite a gift isn't it. I'm glad it resonates with you. Cheers.

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  13. These lovely arrangements made my day. I had hardy begonias in my first Virginia garden, and they put on quite a show in autumn when other plants were done blooming.

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    1. Hey, L. I'll bet you're looking forward to growing these hardies again. All best.

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