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Friday, September 14, 2012

Update: Triple Cure for Tosser's Remorse

I wrote recently about an orange jasmine I got rid of and the tosser's remorse that followed. The remorse is gone. I have jasmine again. Not one, not two – but three.

I scored big at Ballek's Garden Center, which this year celebrated 350 years at its location here in East Haddam, Connecticut, so close to my home and so well stocked that I am unable to resist my excessive urges.

It wasn't excess, however, that got me three plants. I bought one pot that had three plants in it; they'd been there for years, growing as one. Look:



I could have left the plants alone, but why not get three for the price of one. So, after giving the unpotted jasmine a good soaking in water with vitamin-enriched Superthrive, I assembled my surgical tools and went to work. 

The operation took a good bit of time and care, as I had to avoid damaging vital parts. 

After they were separated, the plants were allowed to rest briefly in the operating arena before being taken to the nearby recovery area.



Working quickly, I combed out and pruned the roots, potted up the plants and watered again.



Mission accomplished; it's all over but the waiting. I'll leave the three plants in close proximity to one another while they get used to the separation. Before they go indoors for the winter, they should be growing and blooming (they already had buds).

Unlike the super-sized jasmine I tossed, these plants are good size but not too big to fit into my new attitude of a less cramped and cluttered indoor garden.

Truth be told, that new attitude is an old broken promise; I do have a history of re-cluttering, especially in autumn when plants begin returning indoors. But this time I mean it. I do not want to have to go on a sparing-down binge – and go through tosser's remorse again.

P.S. Just in case, I bought one more jasmine. For insurance; if my surgery failed, and I lost one of three, I'd get that old feeling: remorse.

14 comments:

  1. You crack me up. I think you can forget all about tossers remorse. When you start bringing in plants you will have buyers remose. I know that well. I was thinking I was getting rid of a couple of huge ferns this year. By that I mean that I am going to repot small starts of each and then toss the rest into the compost. Unless I can get friends and relatives to take a piece of each fern. You probably don't remember but I bought six begonias that have grown into behemoths this summer. I will be bringing them in. Oh the house will become small again shortly.

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    1. This time I mean it; I'm being brutal. Just a few minutes ago, I did a walkabout and identified vics that will not be coming in. In fact, I unpotted and tossed a coffee tree on the compost right on the spot. I know, I know; it sounds familiar.

      I do recall your begonias. So, you just can't bear to sacrifice any of them to the ice gods, even in the name of scientific research on begonia survival?

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    2. Ha, not these babies. They will all come into the house to do battle with the neglectful gardener. They may end up on the compost heap but they will have to go through me to get there. The only begonia that is outside is the hardy begonia I bought this spring. I hope it survives. That is as close to scientific research that I will get with my begonias.

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    3. I feel your resolve. I believe you could keep those babies alive through sheer will. Good for you. And them. We'll have to compare hardy begonias; I'll be taking some pictures of mine any day now.

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  2. The best part is where you say (and I quote) "this time I mean it". We shall see what clutter of plants retakes your living spaces this year.

    You performed tricky surgery quite well, and showed great care for your patients. They look like they are happy to be separated, and happy to be in your care. Now show us some jasmine blooms and send a little of their fragrance over the web.

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    Replies
    1. Hey, Laurrie, I know, I know. You believe I could fall off the wagon. Read my reply to debsgarden below. This time I mean it. I'll keep saying it.

      Thank you, the recovery has gone well, and buds survived, moving closer to bloom.

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  3. hi, lee, longtime lurker. i just had to comment on your “tosser” posts. i know, as i'm also longtime anglophile, that the expression “tosser” has a quite different meaning in the u.k.: http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/t.htm. it was the first thing i thought of when i saw the previous “tosser” title, and i thought it was odd.

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    1. Hey, AB, I'm glad to hear from you – and to learn what my "tosser" could mean in UK slang. Whoooeeee! Quite different, indeed. On the Web link you sent, the meanings made me laugh out loud (and cringe a bit).

      Also, I enjoyed my trek through your blog. Cheers.

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  4. You toss one and replace with three, or rather four. This is paring down? More is less? I am trying to figure out how this reverse math works!

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    1. It might seem to be creative math, Deb, but here's what it is: Recently, I have decommissioned more than I have collected. Recently, I edited out about a dozen house plants, giving away some and composting others.

      Sooo, I could buy a few more and still be pared down. I'm resisting, though.

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  5. Well, Dr. Lee May, it appears that your surgery was a success. I hope recovery goes well and your efforts bring many bright, wonderful flowers to your indoor office.

    Don't you just love finding such gems?

    I've been trying to pare down indoor plants as well, but I now have three hibiscus, instead of two, and the fig, and scented geranium, and pineapple palm, and rosemary, and ...

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    1. Thanks for your good wishes, Joene; I do look forward to some aromatherapy when the doctor is in the office.

      And, yes indeed, the gems sure do get in the way of the best intentions to pare down.

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  6. Hey, Lee. So glad you triple-cured your remorse. I guess that plant of three was just hanging around at the nursery waiting for you to come along. It needed surgery from the looks of its pot bound state in the "before" photo. Did you end up with orange jasmine again? I have a confederate jasmine in the garden which I just love. I've never seen an orange jasmine, but I'm sure they must have a delightful scent.

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    1. Hey, Beth. Timing's everything, and I was in time. Yes, the threefer is orange jasmine (Murraya paniculata 'Lakeview'). As you love Confederate jasmine (I did in Georgia), I think you'd love orange jasmine even more. Moreover, it likely would be hardy for you. Alas, here in Connecticut I have to bring mine in and let it perfume the house in winter.

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